Are you deciding to be overwhelmed? - Stand In Your Strength
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Are you deciding to be overwhelmed?

It sounds crazy, doesn’t it?  Who, in their right minds would decide to be overwhelmed?  But in fact, so many of us are doing exactly that.

When we put off making a decision or putting a system in place until the last possible moment, we are prioritizing indecision over productivity. Then the questions that remain unanswered become chatter in our subconscious mind and our attention gets pulled away from whatever we are supposed to be working on. This noise in our subconscious creates overwhelm.

Here’s how it works:

Let’s say that you’re worried about working so much that you continually wonder if you’ll have any time or energy left over for your family or even that ever-elusive thing called self-care. You’re busy. At the same time, you know you need more clients or product sales. You turn toward marketing your business, but you do so knowing that it might cause you to tip the scales into a terrible state of over-working. On top of setting yourself up for self-sabotage, you can’t stop thinking about either not having enough clients or working too much. These conflicting themes crawl into your head at odd moments, like when you’re making dinner, answering emails, or at three in the morning.

The solution to this, simple as it may be, is to make decisions about things that you would rather put off.

For instance, exactly how much do you want to work?  How many clients or sales does that mean? Do you know exactly how much your work load is taxing both your time and energy in any given week?  Do you fill up extra space in your schedule no matter what your work load is? Do you have a system in place for what to do when you have either too many clients (such as a wait list or a referral system) or not enough (client attraction machine)?

Answering these kinds of questions to create systems in your work or family life does wonders for quelling the chatter in your subconscious mind.  It’s as if you could say to your brain, “Naw, I’ve got it. I know what to do if that situation crops up. You can focus on more important things.”

Naturally, you can’t prethink every inevitability. But if there are decisions that you’re putting off making until you know their reality, you may just be setting yourself up for failure.

Take some time today to think about the themes in your life that can create overwhelm. Is it possible to answer some forgotten questions that are pulling away your attention?

My hope for you is that you can recapture some brainspace for the truly important things that you want to accomplish. You are powerful and you can do so much when you are fully present.

To Your Abundance,

Jenean